Observance of Holy Week

Observance of Holy Week

The Book of Common Prayer issues the following invitation: “I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word” (p. 265). I hope the invitation to observe a Holy Lent has born much fruit in your lives this sacred season. Soon we will be preparing to celebrate the high feast days in the Episcopal Church’s liturgical year or Holy Week. In order to mark these days as special, I have scheduled various prayers for every day of holy week. Please refer to the Holy Week Schedule to see what is scheduled each day of the week. For your convenience, all of the evening services are scheduled at 6:00 p.m. The exceptions are Good Friday when Epiphany will pray The Way of the Cross at 12:15 p.m. (in addition to the principle service at 6:00 p.m.), and the Holy Saturday Prayer Service which will take place at 10:00 a.m. May your participation in the drama of Holy Week fill you with abounding love, joy and peace. Fr. Matt April 9: The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday – The Liturgy for Palm Sunday is in two parts.   *The Liturgy of the Palms celebrates Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem. *The second part of the liturgy changes from triumph to tragedy as it focuses on the suffering and death of Jesus. During this week, we will rediscover what God has done for us, rediscover the meaning of our Baptism as well as what it means to share...
A Holy Lent

A Holy Lent

A Holy Lent: The Book of Common Prayer issues the following invitation: “I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word” (p. 265). Does this mean that Lent is simply to be endured, a time to put aside the excesses of my life in order to accomplish a new goal – an exercise plan, weight loss, better eating habits, a more healthy life-style? As good as these goals are, they really don’t have anything to do with Lent. Lent, rather, is the Church’s annual retreat into the desert with Jesus where we encounter all the illusions we live by so as to see – perhaps for the first time – that true life is in God alone. Historically, Lent was always about baptism: going down with Christ into his death and being raised up with him to new life. It was time when the Church prepared those who were to be baptized at the Easter Vigil: the new Christians were born in the waters of baptism and welcomed by a church community who had relived their own 40-day journey from death to new life in Christ. Thus, the entire Church experienced in ever new ways the truth that the deepest meanings of life are to be seen in Jesus own life, death and resurrection: how he willingly died to self so that others might live. The Lenten season begins on March 1, 2017, with the celebration of Ash Wednesday when we are signed with...
Epiphany’s Lenten Program

Epiphany’s Lenten Program

Epiphany’s Lenten Program will begin on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. We will celebrate the Holy Eucharist at 5:30 p.m. in the church. Following the service, we will gather in the Parish Hall for a light meal of soup and salad. Following our common meal together, everyone is invited to participate in the Lenten Program. This year, Fr. Matt will be leading us in a series of Biblical Meditations based on the book by Peter Van Breemen, S.J., entitled: The God of Our Deepest Longings. (Please Note: It isn’t necessary to buy the book unless you want to add it to your library.)       March 8: First Meditation:        “What Are You Looking For?” March 15: Second Meditation:  “Where Do You Live?” March 22: Third Meditation:      “Becoming Transparent” March 29: Fourth Meditation:    “Living From Plenitude” April 5: Fifth Meditation:           “Jesus’ Suffering, Our Suffering” April 12: Sixth Meditation:        “Shalom” Following Fr. Matt’s presentation, we will be invited to delve more deeply into each session’s theme by reflecting on suggested Scripture passages as well as entering into small group discussion. In this way, group members become teachers to one another, following a personal, respectful, and engaged model of adult learning. Please sign up in advance if you are interested in participating in this year’ Lenten Program. We also need hosts to sign up to provide soup, salad and bread for the Wednesday...
Epiphany’s Lenten Program

Epiphany’s Lenten Program

Epiphany’s Lenten Program will begin on Wednesday, February 17, 2016.  We will celebrate the Holy Eucharist at 5:30 pm in the church.  Following the service, we will gather in the Parish Hall for a light meal of soup and salad as well as an opportunity to participate in the Lenten Program. This year, best-selling author Kathleen Norris provides a unique viewpoint on “what matters most,” including: Belief Matters: Why does belief matter?  To what do we give our hearts?  What is the core message of what we believe-creeds or commitment?  To what extent is to believe also “to be-love”? The Bible Matters: The Bible is our collective story.  How is that story reflected in our daily lives?  What is it about the Bible that always seems to address our present moments? Community Matters: In community, individualism and imperfection meet grace and acceptance.  What is our part in the Body of Christ? Place Matters: In what ways is faith set within the physical space of home, church, land and people? We Matter: What does it mean to remain in God’s image and to counter our selfishness by embracing the world and its needs? Each of the five DVD session begins with a 10-15 minute video presentation by Kathleen Norris  followed by filmed interaction with a diverse small group of adults. Following the video presentation, we will be invited to delve more deeply into each session’s theme.  Group members become teachers for one another, following a personal, respectful and engaged model of adult learning. Each person will be supplied with a Participant’s Workbook (suggested donation – $10) which contains all the...
A Holy Lent

A Holy Lent

The Book of Common Prayer issues the following invitation: “I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word” (p. 265).  Does this mean that Lent is simply to be endured, a time to put aside the excesses of my life in order to accomplish a new goal – an exercise plan, weight loss, better eating habits, a more healthy life-style?  As good as these goals are, they really don’t have anything to do with Lent.  Lent, rather, is the Church’s annual retreat into the desert with Jesus where we encounter all the illusions we live by so as to see – perhaps for the first time – that true life is in God alone.  Historically, Lent was always about baptism: going down with Christ into his death and being raised up with him to new life.  It was time when the Church prepared those who were to be baptized at the Easter Vigil:  the new Christians were born in the waters of baptism and welcomed by a church community who had relived their own 40-day journey from death to new life in Christ.  Thus, the entire Church experienced in ever new ways the truth that the deepest meanings of life are to be seen in Jesus own life, death and resurrection: how he willingly died to self so that others might live.  The Lenten season begins on February 10th with the celebration of Ash Wednesday.  On this day we will be signed with...